sodalite | PLAINS of  STONE

Blue, is everywhere in nature . . . or is it? A narrow spectrum of light, blue is rarely seen other than the sky, deep clear bodies of water and a very few flowers or berries. Natural items that are blue that can actually be held in your hands and last for more than a season are extremely rare. When was the last time you found a blue rock? In 1846, the painter Ruskin wrote “The blue of distance, however intense, is not the blue of a bright blue flower.” With less than a handful (pardon the pun) of blue stones unearthed throughout history sodalite is in rare company. The color blue traditionally represents loyalty, fidelity, faith and humility; curious as blue stands for the king of planets, Jupiter. "Sodalite" was known only to indigenous people until officially "discovered" in Greenland and named in 1810. A chemical analysis showed that sodalite's primary components were a combination silicate of aluminum and sodium containing sodium chloride (salt) thus the name SODalite. Some claim the name sodalite, comes from the Latin noun ‘sodalitas’ meaning close association with a group; however the similarity in names appears to be a simple coincidence. Sodalite is known as the Poet's Stone and considered to help a person to express themselves most effectively.

© plains of stone 2019